install theme
The Urgency of Vegetarianism; 
from Living With Shiva

Nonviolence should be clearly defined to include not only killing, but also causing injury physically, mentally or emotionally—even in the most subtle ways. We can injure ourselves, we can injure our environment, we can injure nature’s other creatures and thus be a source of pain and sorrow. Or we can live a harmless life and be a source of healing and joy. My satguru instructed, “Do good to all. God is there within you. Don’t kill. Don’t harbor anger.”
Vegetarianism is a natural and obvious way to live with a minimum of hurt to other beings. Hindu scripture speaks clearly and forcefully on vegetarianism. The Yajur Veda (36.18. ve, p. 342) calls for kindliness toward all creatures living on the Earth, in the air and in the water. The beautiful Tirukural, a widely-read 2,200-year-old masterpiece of ethics, speaks of conscience: “When a man realizes that meat is the butchered flesh of another creature, he will abstain from eating it” (257). The Manu Samhita advises: “Having well considered the origin of flesh and the cruelty of fettering and slaying corporeal beings, let one entirely abstain from eating flesh,” and “When the diet is pure, the mind and heart are pure.” In the yoga-infused verses of the Tirumantiram warning is given of how meat-eating holds the mind in gross, adharmic states: “The ignoble ones who eat flesh, death’s agents bind them fast and push them quick into the fiery jaws of the lower worlds” (199).Vegetarianism is very important. In my fifty years of ministry, it has become quite evident that vegetarian families have far fewer problems than those who are not vegetarian. The abhorrence of killing of any kind leads quite naturally to a vegetarian diet. If you think about it, the meat-eater is participating indirectly in a violent act against the animal kingdom. His desire for meat drives another man to kill and provide that meat. The act of the butcher begins with the desire of the consumer. When his consciousness lifts and expands, he will abhor violence and not be able to even digest the meat, fish and eggs he was formerly consuming. India’s greatest saints have confirmed that one cannot eat meat and live a peaceful, harmonious life. Man’s appetite for meat inflicts devastating harm on the Earth itself, stripping its precious forests to make way for pastures. The opposite of causing injury to others is compassion and love for all beings. The Tirukural (251) puts it nicely: “How can he practice true compassion who eats the flesh of an animal to fatten his own flesh?” If children are raised as vegetarians, every day they are exposed to noninjury as a principle of peace and compassion. Every day they are growing up, they are remembering and being reminded to not kill. They won’t even kill another creature to feed themselves. And if you won’t kill another creature to feed yourself, then when you grow up you will be much less likely to injure people.There are other ways that we as individuals or institutions can responsibly promote nonviolence. Make a list of all the things you have purchased in the last six months that bring harm to humans, animals, fish, fowl and other sentient beings. Read the labels on simple things like glue or soap and scratch off the list all the things that contribute to violent acts or aid in the destruction of the planet. Then find the willpower to not, for convenience sake, fall back into purchasing these things again. 

The Urgency of Vegetarianism;

from Living With Shiva


Nonviolence should be clearly defined to include not only killing, but also causing injury physically, mentally or emotionally—even in the most subtle ways. We can injure ourselves, we can injure our environment, we can injure nature’s other creatures and thus be a source of pain and sorrow. Or we can live a harmless life and be a source of healing and joy. My satguru instructed, “Do good to all. God is there within you. Don’t kill. Don’t harbor anger.”


Vegetarianism is a natural and obvious way to live with a minimum of hurt to other beings. Hindu scripture speaks clearly and forcefully on vegetarianism. The Yajur Veda (36.18. ve, p. 342) calls for kindliness toward all creatures living on the Earth, in the air and in the water. The beautiful Tirukural, a widely-read 2,200-year-old masterpiece of ethics, speaks of conscience: “When a man realizes that meat is the butchered flesh of another creature, he will abstain from eating it” (257). The Manu Samhita advises: “Having well considered the origin of flesh and the cruelty of fettering and slaying corporeal beings, let one entirely abstain from eating flesh,” and “When the diet is pure, the mind and heart are pure.” In the yoga-infused verses of the Tirumantiram warning is given of how meat-eating holds the mind in gross, adharmic states: “The ignoble ones who eat flesh, death’s agents bind them fast and push them quick into the fiery jaws of the lower worlds” (199).

Vegetarianism is very important. In my fifty years of ministry, it has become quite evident that vegetarian families have far fewer problems than those who are not vegetarian. The abhorrence of killing of any kind leads quite naturally to a vegetarian diet. If you think about it, the meat-eater is participating indirectly in a violent act against the animal kingdom. His desire for meat drives another man to kill and provide that meat. The act of the butcher begins with the desire of the consumer. When his consciousness lifts and expands, he will abhor violence and not be able to even digest the meat, fish and eggs he was formerly consuming. India’s greatest saints have confirmed that one cannot eat meat and live a peaceful, harmonious life. Man’s appetite for meat inflicts devastating harm on the Earth itself, stripping its precious forests to make way for pastures. The opposite of causing injury to others is compassion and love for all beings. The Tirukural (251) puts it nicely: “How can he practice true compassion who eats the flesh of an animal to fatten his own flesh?” 

If children are raised as vegetarians, every day they are exposed to noninjury as a principle of peace and compassion. Every day they are growing up, they are remembering and being reminded to not kill. They won’t even kill another creature to feed themselves. And if you won’t kill another creature to feed yourself, then when you grow up you will be much less likely to injure people.

There are other ways that we as individuals or institutions can responsibly promote nonviolence. Make a list of all the things you have purchased in the last six months that bring harm to humans, animals, fish, fowl and other sentient beings. Read the labels on simple things like glue or soap and scratch off the list all the things that contribute to violent acts or aid in the destruction of the planet. Then find the willpower to not, for convenience sake, fall back into purchasing these things again. 

  1. earthkeyper reblogged this from hinducosmos
  2. saintshiva reblogged this from jayalalita
  3. acetaiji reblogged this from hinducosmos
  4. the-2pacalypse reblogged this from hinducosmos
  5. hinducosmos reblogged this from sherputt
  6. mexicanbrat reblogged this from satrangi-re
  7. pwalloot reblogged this from yeh-hai-meri-kahaani
  8. sadhaak reblogged this from jai-harihara
  9. sharktigress reblogged this from jai-harihara
  10. gadagajendra reblogged this from davidaedwards
  11. davidaedwards reblogged this from yeh-hai-meri-kahaani
  12. satrangi-re reblogged this from yeh-hai-meri-kahaani
  13. yeh-hai-meri-kahaani reblogged this from jai-harihara
  14. jai-harihara reblogged this from jayalalita
  15. gingierabbit reblogged this from thehindublog
  16. deff666 reblogged this from jayalalita
  17. hippie-evolution reblogged this from spiritual-awakening
  18. spiritual-awakening reblogged this from thehindublog
  19. safiyahandre reblogged this from thehindublog
  20. jayalalita reblogged this from theblazinggodhead
  21. theblazinggodhead reblogged this from philosophia-perennis
  22. noonewouldriotforless reblogged this from dose-me
  23. freesocrates reblogged this from dose-me and added:
    Obviously, it should go without saying, I don’t use Hindu scripture as a justification for my vegetarianism…. lol but...
  24. mesmerizingtheultra reblogged this from dose-me