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« If you want to see the heroic, look at those who can love in return for hatred. If you want to see the brave, look for those who can forgive. »

- Bhagavad Gita (via cosmofilius)
If everybody’s soul is Krishna then why is there so much negativity and violence in this world?
 Sri Sri Ravi Shankar: The soul is God, but in many people the God inside is sleeping, and so you are not able to see the light that is deep inside. The Divine is also in those who do wrong things. It is not that people who do bad things are devoid of God, no, it is just that the Divinity is covered; sleeping.In Sanskrit we say, ‘Devi Jagran’. This means that Divine qualities exist in everyone, it only needs to be awakened. These Divine qualities are dormant in our consciousness and need to be awakened.If you see, in an awakened consciousness there will be no negativity or violence.

We should see the world and all its event as a play. That is why it is called as a Leela (Divine Play).

If everybody’s soul is Krishna then why is there so much negativity and violence in this world?

 
Sri Sri Ravi Shankar: 
The soul is God, but in many people the God inside is sleeping, and so you are not able to see the light that is deep inside. The Divine is also in those who do wrong things. It is not that people who do bad things are devoid of God, no, it is just that the Divinity is covered; sleeping.
In Sanskrit we say, ‘Devi Jagran’. This means that Divine qualities exist in everyone, it only needs to be awakened. These Divine qualities are dormant in our consciousness and need to be awakened.
If you see, in an awakened consciousness there will be no negativity or violence.

We should see the world and all its event as a play. That is why it is called as a Leela (Divine Play).

Happy Onam to all my fellow Malayalis
Wishing everyone a wonderful Thiruonam and a prosperous year ahead.

Anant Chaturdashi and Ganesh Visarjan
On Ganesh Chaturthi (29th of August, the birthday of the Lord), we brought in clay murtis of our beloved Lord Ganpati to our homes and mandirs. Prana prathista took place; Bhagvan arriving into the murthi and remaining there, listening to our prayers, accepting our offerings and blessing us with His most pure presence for the duration of Ganesh Utsav.
10 days has passed with the supreme Lord Ganesh in our presence within His clay form. The last day of Ganesh Utsav, called Anant Chaturdashi is today. On Anant Chaturdashi, we perform Ganesh Visarjan. We return the Lord in His clay form back to the earth by means of waterways and oceans. We immerse His murthi in rivers, seas, lakes and ponds, reuniting the Lord within Himself.
By releasing the murthi in natural water, we realize His absolute presence is not only temporarily with us during Ganesh Utsav, but is constantly flowing all around us. Water is essential to all life on earth; nothing living can exist without it. Not one person can think of a day in which water was not utilized in some way to sustain their life; such is the divinity of Bhagvan. God is all around us in every form and in all types of matter. We are not destroying or letting go of our murthis as we immerse them in water and they eventually disintegrate; we are reuniting them with Brahman! 
Ganpati Bappa Morya!
*If you will be immersing a murthi, please make sure it is made of clay. Murthis made of non-disintegrating materials will be harmful to the earth.
India: September 8thUSA: September 7thUK: September 7thCanada: September 7thMalaysia: September 8th

Anant Chaturdashi and Ganesh Visarjan

On Ganesh Chaturthi (29th of August, the birthday of the Lord), we brought in clay murtis of our beloved Lord Ganpati to our homes and mandirs. Prana prathista took place; Bhagvan arriving into the murthi and remaining there, listening to our prayers, accepting our offerings and blessing us with His most pure presence for the duration of Ganesh Utsav.

10 days has passed with the supreme Lord Ganesh in our presence within His clay form. The last day of Ganesh Utsav, called Anant Chaturdashi is today. On Anant Chaturdashi, we perform Ganesh Visarjan. We return the Lord in His clay form back to the earth by means of waterways and oceans. We immerse His murthi in rivers, seas, lakes and ponds, reuniting the Lord within Himself.

By releasing the murthi in natural water, we realize His absolute presence is not only temporarily with us during Ganesh Utsav, but is constantly flowing all around us. Water is essential to all life on earth; nothing living can exist without it. Not one person can think of a day in which water was not utilized in some way to sustain their life; such is the divinity of Bhagvan. God is all around us in every form and in all types of matter. We are not destroying or letting go of our murthis as we immerse them in water and they eventually disintegrate; we are reuniting them with Brahman! 

Ganpati Bappa Morya!

*If you will be immersing a murthi, please make sure it is made of clay. Murthis made of non-disintegrating materials will be harmful to the earth.

India: September 8th
USA: September 7th
UK: September 7th
Canada: September 7th
Malaysia: September 8th

« One group, the Hindu American Foundation, has launched a “Take Back Yoga” campaign to address what they see as a fundamental disconnect between yoga and Hinduism.

Sheetal Shah, senior director at the foundation, says the group started the campaign when it noticed that while “Vedic,” “tantric” and many other words appeared regularly in yoga magazines, the word “Hindu” was never mentioned.

So, the foundation called up one of the country’s most popular magazines to ask why.

"They said the word ‘Hinduism’ has a lot of baggage," Shah says. "And we were like, ‘Excuse me?’ "

Shah says she understands why some people have a problem with linking yoga and Hinduism. Many American practitioners associate the practice with something pure and serene, she says. But when they think of Hinduism, she says, they think of “multiple gods, with multiple heads and multiple arms. Colorful [and] ritualistic.

It may be difficult for people to see how these things fit together, Shah says.

With the Take Back Yoga campaign, the Hindu American Foundation is hoping for broader acknowledgment that yoga has Hindu philosophical roots — while also emphasizing that it is universal and appropriate for everyone.

"What we’re trying to say is that the holistic practice of yoga goes beyond just a couple of asanas [postures] on a mat. It is a lifestyle, and it’s a philosophy," Shah says.

"How do you lead your life in terms of truthfulness? And nonviolence? And purity? The lifestyle aspect of yoga," Shah says, "has been lost."

»

shivaom:

DURGA DEVI ॐ

shivaom:

DURGA DEVI ॐ

chippedcupofchai:

Hindu Mythology Meme | Scriptures 1/1: Srimad Bhagavata Purana

Srimad Bhagavatam Puraanam amalam yad Vaishnavanam priyam
Y’asmin paramahansyam ekam amalam gyanam param giyate
tatra gyana-viraga-bhakti-sahitam naiskarmyam avisktam
ta shravanam su-pathan vicharana-paro bhaktya vimukshyen narah

The Bhagavat Puran, authored by Ved Vyas immediately after the great epic Mahabharat, is one of the most illustrious scriptures in the Hindu canon. By means of stories from the lives of avatars, sages, devotees, and kings, it popularizes the truths contained in the Vedas. At present, more than two hundred million Hindus find in it their most cherished expressions of religious faith and their dearest exemplars. To study it is the best of all ways to become acquainted with the living religion of India.

The text has a ubiquitous presence in Hindu theology, performing arts, ritual recitation, and commentary. It has had a formative influence on the relationship between the sacred text and the divine image, the metaphysical and cosmological underpinnings of Ancient Indian thought, and the overall shaping of Indian culture. Its popularity stems from its unique ability to strike the difficult balance between the heart and the head, devotion and learning. 

Perhaps the most well-known segment of the Bhagavat Puran is its Tenth Canto. In it is a detailed account of the life of Krishna, the beloved incarnation of Lord Vishnu. Through his actions and the deeds of those who loved and lived for him, it expands on his teachings summarized in the Bhagavad Gita.

Radha Ashtami
Also known as Radha Jayanti, on this day we celebrate the birth of Sri Krishna’s divine counterpart, Goddess Radha. Radha Rani is the complete embodiment of love, devotion and bhakti. May we all attain some morsel of Her loyalty so that we too can reach the realm of bliss and divinity. Many devotees take vrat (fast) on this day.
Wishing you all a joyous and pious Radha Ashtami! 
USA, UK, Canada, India, Malaysia: September 2nd

Radha Ashtami

Also known as Radha Jayanti, on this day we celebrate the birth of Sri Krishna’s divine counterpart, Goddess Radha. Radha Rani is the complete embodiment of love, devotion and bhakti. May we all attain some morsel of Her loyalty so that we too can reach the realm of bliss and divinity. Many devotees take vrat (fast) on this day.

Wishing you all a joyous and pious Radha Ashtami! 

USA, UK, Canada, India, Malaysia: September 2nd

hinducosmos:

Sri Krishna, His Lilas and Teachings  (via Dolls of India)

hinducosmos:

Sri Krishna, His Lilas and Teachings (via Dolls of India)

>Hiatus

I will be on vacation this following week. In the meantime, feel free to ask me anything and I will work on answering as soon as I get back.

Wishing you all a blessed week~

Jai Sri Krishna!

At the end of you answering question you always put in something like "Jai Bum Bhole" could you tell us what some of these phrases mean? Namaste

Namaste,

At the end of prayers and pujas, it’s routine for devotees to call out a small praise or recite the many names of Bhagvan. So, for my posts, I always add a small praise to Bhagvan (God), depending on which facet of Bhagvan was guiding me through the question or was on my mind whilst answering.

For the question that I ended with “Jai Bum Bhole!”, or “Jai Bhole Nath!” I was thinking of Lord Shiva. Bum is the one of the beej (seed/root) mantras to Lord Shiva. Bhole Nath is one of the 108 names of Lord Shiva which means the ‘Kind Hearted One’.

Jai means ‘victory to…’, ‘praises to…’ or ‘reverence to…’. For example:

Jai Sri Krishna (which I use a lot) means ‘Praises to Lord Krishna’.
Jai Bajrangbali means ‘Victory to Lord Hanuman’ (He with the strength of a diamond).
Jai Bhavani Maa means ‘Reverence to Mother Durga’ (She like the abode of the universe).

I hope I’ve helped!

Jai Ambe Maa! (Victory to gentle Mother Durga!)

Anonymous asked:
I want to get a tattoo of symbol that I will be able to use to symbolize being a Hindu. I want the om word written in Hindi but I want to know whether there are other symbols too? I have uttermost respect for my religion as a Hindu which is why I want to display it on my body.

Namaste,

The traditional Sanskrit OM is symbolic of Hinduism, while other variations of the OM are often symbolic of other religious streams that have taken on the OM from its Hindu roots. However, since India has thousands of languages, there are regional variations of the symbol. The Devanagari writing (Hindi) of OM is either ‘ओं’ or more commonly ‘ॐ’. Other Hindu OM variations are found in Bengali, Assamese and Oriya script, Grantha script, Tamil script, Telugu script and Malayalam script.

Such various other symbols from certain regions may be written in their particular script, but they also connote a religion different from Hinduism. This includes the Sikh ‘Ik Omkar’ written in Gurmukhi script, the Buddhist OM written in differing Tibetan, Balinese, Javanese and Siddham scripts, and lastly the variation of the Jain OM.

If your intent is to display your faith in Hinduism, be careful in choosing which OM you will use, as some OMs connote Sikhism, Buddhism or Jainism.

I hope I’ve helped!

Jai Bum Bhole!

>Happy Krishna Janmashtami to you all!

(also known as Krishna Jayanti, Gokulashtami)

This year marks Lord Krishna’s 5241st birthday!

This Jayanti will take place on the 16th of August in the Western Hemisphere and the 17th in the Eastern Hemisphere. Parana will take place the day after. Please check your city for specific Tithi and Puja times!

Wishing you all a blessed night~

THE BIRTH OF OUR LORD SRI KRISHNA - KRISHNA JANMASHTAMI 2014

Many thousands of years ago, the city of Mathura in northern India was ruled by a powerful and evil demon called Kansa.

The people of Mathura and of the surrounding villages were terrified of Kansa, and tired of his cruelty. It seemed that there was no one on earth brave and strong enough to defeat Kansa. Kansa seemed invincible.

But Kansa did have one soft spot, and that was his fondness for his sister Devaki. Devaki was good, kind and gentle, as unlike the cruel Kansa as possible. When Devaki was old enough, it was arranged that she would marry Vasudev, a good and noble man who was a follower of Vishnu, and did not fear the demon Kansa at all. Kansa, despite his evil ways, held Vasudev in great respect. So Kansa rejoiced at Devaki’s marriage with Vasudev, and celebrated the wedding with everyone else.

But suddenly, as the wedding ceremony came to an end, a voice was heard - a voice which seemed to come from the sky, and which filled the great hall and awed all those who stood there. ‘The marriage of Devaki and Vasudev shall be blessed, for of this union shall be born eight sons,’ said the voice. ‘But let the demon Kansa beware - Devaki’s eighth son will be his end.’

The entire gathering was thrown into fear and confusion. Kansa’s rage knew no bounds. The ground shook with his fury. ‘Who dared speak such sacrilege?’ he roared. But even in his anger Kansa recognised the voice of destiny, and he was afraid. ‘Throw them into prison,’ he thundered, pointing at Devaki and Vasudev. ‘Let them be watched every minute of the day for the rest of their lives!’ Kansa’s demon soldiers surrounded Devaki and Vasudev and took them off to the deepest, most secure dungeon in Kansa’s palace.

Devaki and Vasudev lived in the dungeon, watched night and day by Kansa’s soldiers. Many years passed. Devaki gave birth to six sons, one after another. Kansa killed each child within minutes of its birth.

When Devaki was expecting her seventh child, Vasudev prayed long and hard to Vishnu. ‘Save this child,’ he prayed. ‘Don’t let Kansa kill all our sons!’ Vishnu heard his prayers, and magically transferred the baby into the womb of Rohini, another wife of Vasudev. Soon Rohini gave birth to the baby, Devaki’s seventh son. He was called Balaram, and brought up safely and in secret by Rohini among the villagers of Braj. Meanwhile, Devaki and Vasudev told Kansa that their seventh child had been born dead.

Very soon after, Devaki began expecting her eighth child, the one, it had been said, who would kill Kansa. Kansa doubled the guards on the prison, and waited anxiously for the birth of this child.

Devaki’s eighth son was born at midnight on a dark and stormy night in the month of Sravan. The baby was as dark as the clouds that covered the sky that night. He was therefore called Krishna, which means ‘dark’ or ‘black’.

Vasudev and Devaki waited in fear for Kansa to appear, but suddenly all was silent. The guards at the prison door fell asleep, as did every living creature in that great palace. Suddenly the dark dungeon was filled with a shining light and once again there came a voice out of the sky.

'Take your son to Gokul, across the river Yamuna, to the house of Nand, the cowherd,' said the voice to Vasudev. 'Nand's wife has just had a baby. Leave your son with her, and bring her child back to Devaki.'

The light vanished and the prison became as dark and dreary as before. But the doors stood open, the locks broken, the guards snoring with their heads on their weapons. Vasudev’s chains fell away from his ankles. In great wonder, he took up his son in his arms, and walked out of his prison, into the dark and stormy night.

Vasudev walked through the pouring rain, holding his newborn baby close to his chest, safe from the wind and the wet, trusting in the divine voice. But when he came to the river Yamuna, he saw that the great river was in flood. The bridge had been washed away, and no boat would be able to cross that furious flood.

Vasudev despaired - how would he cross the river? Yet he had to obey the divine voice. Vasudev stepped into the angry waters, the baby held high above his head. The river rose higher and higher, the waves grew ever more furious, and Vasudev feared for his life.

But the newborn baby laughed, and put its tiny foot out of its swaddling sheets and touched the waves. All at once the river stopped raging, the waves grew still and the water level subsided.

And from the river rose a huge serpent. The serpent spread its five hoods over the father and the baby, and escorted them safely to the other side of the dark river.

Vasudev climbed out onto the far bank of the Yamuna. Silently he marvelled at the wonders he had seen, but hurried on to find the house of Nand, chief of the cowherds of Gokul.

In Gokul all was silent, except for the pouring rain. Men, women and children slept safe and dry inside their homes. Vasudev found his way to Nand’s house. Here too, all was silent. Vasudev shook Nand awake, and explained the prophecy and told him what the voice had asked him to do. Nand led him unquestioningly to his newborn child.

A lamp burned low in the room where Nand’s wife Yashodha slept with her newborn baby daughter. Silently, quietly, Vasudev entered the room. He laid his baby son down beside Yashodha and picked up her baby daughter. Just as silently as he had come, Vasudev returned to Mathura with the baby girl.

In Mathura, all was as he had left it - everyone slept, deep in an enchanted sleep. The prison guards snored over their weapons, the prison doors stood wide open, the palace was silent. Only Devaki waited, awake and anxious, for Vasudev’s safe return.

Vasudev entered his prison, and laid the baby girl beside Devaki. The prison doors shut on their own, Vasudev’s chains fastened themselves around his ankles, and the prison guards woke up, stretching and yawning, and amazed that they had fallen so sound asleep. The guards hurried to the prison door to make sure their prisoners were still safe and secure, and saw Devaki holding a newborn baby in her arms.

'The eighth child, the eighth child has been born!' cried the guards. A messenger went running to summon the demon king Kansa.

Kansa came at once, angry yet afraid. He flung open the prison doors and snatched the baby from Devaki’s arms. ‘The baby is a girl,’ said Devaki. ‘How can she harm you, brother?’ asked Vasudev. ‘Will you not spare us at least one child?’

But Kansa was not to be moved. ‘This is your eighth child,’ roared Kansa. ‘Girl or boy, the child must die!’ But the baby slipped out of his hands, and shining with a glorious light, flew out of the prison window. All that remained was a laugh and a sweet voice which said, ‘Kansa, you cannot kill me! I am Devi, born as a baby to fool you! Your destroyer has been born as foretold, and he is safe! You will die at the hands of Devaki’s eighth son!’

Kansa was furious, but there was nothing he could do. ‘You will rot in prison forever,’ he roared at Devaki and Vasudev. ‘I will find your eighth child and kill him, no matter what it takes!’

But Krishna was safe in Gokul, with Nand and Yashodha, who accepted him as their son.

It was Lord Vishnu Himself’s serpent Shesh Nag, who spread his hoods over Vasudev and Krishna, to guide them safely across the river.